Forum Posts

Madi Williamson
Feb 15, 2021
In The Brothers Campaign
The Brothers Campaign was born of the recognition of the unique vulnerabilities migrant males face all along the refugee pathway, from disproportionate exposure to conflict and violence in their home countries to exploitation along the migratory pathway and social stigmatization in resettlement countries. While there are organizations and individuals on the ground who recognize the neglect that many men in displacement experience, little is being done to address the systemic causes of this problem. In-Sight Collaborative, Refugee Biriyani & Bananas, and our campaign supporters have identified three primary systemic influences on the gaps in aid delivery and support of the men: 1) Social stigmatization of forcibly displaced males 2) The widespread use of vulnerability framework 3) Misunderstanding of male-specific risks and coping strategies when it comes to psychological and psychosocial damage to forcibly displaced men The resulting discrepancies and inequities lead to challenges for the men both phenomenologically/qualitatively (their lived experience in displacement), and logistically, which is more quantitative and can point to numerical data supporting their exclusion from resources. In-Sight and RBB echo the calls of a growing number of researchers, practitioners, and most importantly, our brothers, for more attention to be given to the needs of displaced males. We hope that this forum provides an opportunity for researchers and practitioners to share ideas and resources that support the understanding of this issue.
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Madi Williamson
Feb 15, 2021
In COVID-19 and Migration
A policy brief by Sanchez and Achilli Anecdotally, those of us working on the ground in forced migration contexts have noticed the immense consequences of COVID-19 on regular and irregular migration as "the closure of borders and other state-imposed mobility restrictions are effectively and intentionally redirecting migrants into more perilous landscapes where humanitarian support and rescue are often unavailable." We tend to dozens of distress calls a week as people are subjected to police brutality, illegal pushbacks, rejection to asylum cases, and exploitation as a result of limited resources and safe migration pathways. Suspension of services has sparked mental health crises as people are forced to wait even longer for asylum decisions while being confined to horrific conditions in refugee camps. Closed borders have further limited the already scarce safe migration pathways for those forced to flee their homes and as mentioned by Sanchez and Achilli, those being forced into more dangerous irregular pathways are out of reach of those of us trying to keep them safe. Authoritarianism in the name of population health is rampant with marginalized populations bearing the brunt of the consequences. "Any solutions to contain the reliance on irregular migration facilitation and to contribute to migrants' safety under COVID-19 or any other future crisis must recognize the systematic decrease of paths for safe, orderly, and regular migration that motivate the demand for smuggling services, and the ways migration and border controls have systemically put migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees and their communities at risk, leaving the structural reasons leading to the emergence of smuggling unattended." It is vital for all of those involved in migration issues to understand the intricacies of irregular migration and the consequences the pandemic is having on this process. Read the full article here: https://cadmus.eui.eu/handle/1814/67069
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Madi Williamson
Feb 15, 2021
In Introduce Yourself
Hi, everyone! My name is Madi and I am a founder and the current executive director of In-Sight Collaborative. I am an RN from Seattle with a focus on public health, health education, and trauma-informed care in migration. I've been working in the humanitarian sector since 2016 with a focus on the MENA region and a particular soft spot for Greece, Turkey, and Palestine. In-Sight Collaborative was born out of a recognition for a more informed and humanity-focused narrative in migration issues. My early experiences in 2016 and the incredible people who have mentored me throughout my career taught me that we view these issues through a very broken lens shaped by colonialism, supremacy, saviorism, and expert mentality. This approach leaves no space for healing, nor does it cultivate any productive development for individuals and communities who have been displaced. I am passionate about research, particularly qualitative research that explores phenomenology in displacement contexts, and my favorite part about my work is getting to spend time with people from different backgrounds and cultures than me. I learn so much from our brothers and sisters experiencing displacement and from those who come to play a part in intervening. I am looking forward to exchanging ideas on this platform and learning from all of you!
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